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Frosted Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits (grain-free)

Growing up, one of my favorite traditions was enjoying weekend breakfasts out with my family. While we often ate unsweetened cereals with milk during the school week, weekends were a special treat when I could order anything I wanted–> donuts with frosting and sprinkles, chewy bagels smothered in butter, and, perhaps my favorite, frosted cinnamon raisin biscuits from Hardee’s.

Nothing like a sugar rush at 8 a.m. to wake you up.

Though I haven’t had a real cinnamon raisin biscuit in years (Hardee’s don’t seem to exist on the west coast!), I suddenly had a craving for them this weekend and decided I must attempt my own version. Not surprisingly, mine are grain-free and naturally sweetened with honey–> making them a much healthier option, without the dreaded sugar rush to follow.

And, I dare say, I like mine better.

Frosted Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits
makes 8 biscuits

adapted from Elana’s biscuit recipe

Ingredients:

For the biscuits:

2 1/2 cups blanched almond flour
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 cup coconut oil, softened (or butter)
2 eggs, at room temperature
2 Tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2/3 cup raisins

For the frosting:

2 Tablespoons coconut oil, softened
2 Tablespoons raw honey
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of sea salt

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 350F. In a medium bowl, combine the almond flour, sea salt, cinnamon and baking soda, and whisk well. In a separate bowl, stir together the coconut oil, eggs and honey, then add them to the dry ingredients and mix until a dough forms.

Note: If your eggs are cold, they will solidify the coconut oil, making the wet mixture rather chunky–> but don’t worry, you can still mix it into the dry mixture, then stir very well with a spatula until it creates a uniform dough.

Stir in the raisins, then use a 1/4 cup to scoop out 8 portions of dough. I used my hands to create biscuit-like shapes, because I was too lazy to roll out the dough and use a biscuit cutter. Of course, feel free to use any method you like!

My approach created rather scone-like biscuits… but let’s just go with it.

Place the biscuit dough on a baking sheet, lined with a Silpat, and bake at 350F for about 13-15 minutes.

After 13 minutes, I could smell that mine were done! Your house will reek of cinnamon by the time you’re done with these.

I trust that won’t be a problem.

Allow the biscuits to cool on the pan for 5 minutes, then use a spatula to transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.

These biscuits are delicious on their own, but, like most things, the frosting takes them over the top.

Simply whip together the coconut oil, honey, vanilla and salt until creamy, then spread generously onto the cooled biscuits!

If you don’t wait for the biscuits to cool completely, your frosting will melt into a glaze…

which is also delicious.

However you make them, I hope you enjoy!

4.8 from 6 reviews
Frosted Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits (grain-free)
Author: 
 
Grain-free and naturally sweetened with honey, these cinnamon raisin biscuits are a tasty breakfast treat.
Ingredients
  • Biscuits: 2½ cups blanched almond flour
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ cup coconut oil, softened (or butter)
  • 2 eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 Tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ⅔ cup raisins
  • Frosting: 2 Tablespoons coconut oil, softened
  • 2 Tablespoons raw honey
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of sea salt
Instructions
  1. For the biscuits, preheat your oven to 350F.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the almond flour, sea salt, cinnamon and baking soda, and whisk well.
  3. In a separate bowl, stir together the coconut oil, eggs and honey, then add them to the dry ingredients and mix until a dough forms. (Note: If your eggs are cold, they will solidify the coconut oil, making the wet mixture rather chunky--> but don't worry, you can still mix it into the dry mixture, then stir very well with a spatula until it creates a uniform dough.)
  4. Stir in the raisins, then use a ¼ cup to scoop out 8 portions of dough. I used my hands to create biscuit-like shapes, because I was too lazy to roll out the dough and use a biscuit cutter. Feel free to use any method you like!
  5. Place the biscuit dough on a baking sheet, lined with a Silpat, and bake at 350F for about 13-15 minutes. (After 13 minutes, I could smell that mine were done!)
  6. Allow the biscuits to cool on the pan for 5 minutes, then use a spatula to transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. To prepare the frosting, simply whip together the coconut oil, honey, vanilla and salt until creamy, then spread generously onto the cooled biscuits!
Notes
If you don't wait for the biscuits to cool completely, your frosting will melt into a glaze... which is also delicious.

Reader Feedback: Did you have any breakfast traditions growing up? Any special breakfast treats?

36 comments to Frosted Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits (grain-free)

  • Mmmm cinnamon raisin is one of my favourite breakfast flavours. Someone in my office seems to have cinnamon raisin toast every morning for breakfast but I’m not sure who it is because the closest I get to it is when I walk into the kitchen after they’ve toasted it and walked away! My breakfast ‘traditions’ were of the unhealthy sort – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Eggos, and Pop Tarts. Helloooo cavities. (Strangely I don’t have any cavities – it’s quite a miracle!)

  • Yum, these sound like a delicious weekend breakfast! Growing up I wasn’t much of a breakfast lover, but now I am, esp on the weekends when I have more time!! Have a great week!

  • jen

    Those sound amazing.

    I’m wondering if you could do or were planning on doing an overall update on how you feel since giving up grains. Or, I assume you’ve given up grains because of all the awesome things you’re posting that don’t involve them.

    Do you notice better overall energy? Is your skin better? Is your digestion any different? Have you lost weight? Are there any downsides? I’m contemplating going grain free for a while and am wondering what you’ve found to be true for you.

    • Thanks for the reminder, Jen– I will plan a post on the grain-free issue!

      I have been feeling really good without them, so I’ve just kept it up. And YES to all of the benefits you’ve mentioned. I’ll go into more detail in a post, but really, the only downside I can see is that it maybe a challenge to break those deeply-engrained habits, at first. It does get easier, though!

      • Mary Beth

        Engrained habits…. Nice! Iverecently given mine up and I have to say it’s actually way easier than I ever expected. Especially having access to all the grain free recipes on the Internet. Ps your website rocks! I’m so mad that I just found it! The food combining world seems lonely until you join forces!

  • Those look delicious. I don’t even remember the last time I had a cinnamon roll or something similar.

  • jeanne

    These look delicious! I love the glaze!

    My favorite thing was hot chocolate, my mom served it to me in a giant bowl and it was sooooo good. For many years, my version of that was hot coffee, but now I sort of do a detoxified version with either a teeccino, decaf, a warmed up mug of almond milk, or a chai tea. Once in a while I’ll do chocolate. It’s this habit of a warm drink with breakfast that keeps me from drinking a green juice in the morning…I just do not want something cold. I force myself sometimes, but I’m not satisfied until I get my hot fix…thanks mom!

    • I like to have my “hot fix” in the morning, too– be it coffee, tea or just hot water. Green juice usually waits until later in the morning, when I’m warmer. :)

  • Love love these. How awesome do these look. Saving this recipe pronto! Hm breakfast traditions, I don’t think so I was a swimmer growing up so I usually grabbed toast before practice otherwise I was a bad child and didn’t eat breakfast. Can’t even imagine that now!

  • Mmmm these look phenomenal! I can’t wait to try them out. Love your blog by the way, I found it through Kilee Johnson. Can’t wait to keep reading!

  • Hasmik

    Is it possible to replace the eggs by another ingredient ? I do not eat eggs, butter and margarine. Would be very happy about any advice!

  • hasmik

    Thanks a lot – I will try and let you know for sure!!

  • Megan: I think Hardee’s is called Carl Junior’s on the west coast, but you aren’t missing anything!

    I’m a terrible biscuit maker. These might change my luck!

  • Kim Turner

    I’d like to try these for my kids, who are gluten intolerant; but my son also has an almond intolerance…do you think coconut flour works as a substitute for almond flour in this and other baking recipes? I’m new to all of this! :)

    • Unfortunately, coconut flour cannot be substituted– it’s a very complicated ingredient to work with! If your son can handle a different type of nut, any ground nut meal should work, though!

      Good luck, and let us know if you have any success! :)

  • Karen

    I made these this weekend and they were awesome! I know I’ll be making them again. My icing didn’t look like yours, though, mine was very runny. I’m wondering if it was the type of coconut oil, because it is runny to begin with.

    • It also depends on the temperature! Since it’s the peak of summer, your kitchen will be warmer and your coconut oil will be in a liquid-state. Coconut oil is solid if the temperature is below 76 degrees, which makes it a little thicker for frosting. The biscuits also need to be completely cooled to keep the frosting thick, rather than runny. However, I found it tasty either way!

  • Karen

    Btw, I intended to rate it 5 stars above, but it wasn’t working correctly.

  • KMAT

    Suppose I wanted to add some pumpkin pie spice to these…about how much would you recommend? Love the recipe but I’ve been adding fall flavor to everything lately!

    • Are you wanting to add it in addition to the cinnamon that’s already in the recipe? If so, I’d say just add maybe a 1/2 teaspoon extra of pumpkin pie spice. Otherwise, you could replace the cinnamon completely with pumpkin pie spice– maybe 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons total?

      Please let us know how it goes! :)

  • RosiZee

    This recipe is great! I have to leave them in the oven for much longer than the recipe says-up to an hour- but they always turn out brilliantly :-) So far I have made the recipe straight, a coconut and sultana version, a straight almond version (with almond extract and a whole almond on top) and last night I made the recipe as it is and added a little shredded coconut, dark chocolate chunks and cherry chunks-I’ve just had one for afternoon tea and it was delicious! I love your recipes-they are simple to do, much healthier than shop bought, vegan/easy to veganise and give me the inspiration and confidence to experiment in the kitchen :-)

  • Brigitte

    I’m very interested in the food combining aspect of your recipes. Am I correct in saying many of them are not properly combined? Just trying to understand the whole combining of foods thing. As in this recipe, should almonds be eaten with eggs? When would one eat this and how long is the digestion time? I realize it’s probably meant as a ‘treat’ but I’m just trying to figure out the best times to eat these ‘treats’ and not sabotage myself. Btw, I love your Peanut Butter Blondies, they are a staple in my ‘treats’. I also love the simplicity of your recipes. Thanks for your creativity and for sharing them.

    • Megan

      Most of the baked almond flour recipes on my site are NOT strictly combined, due to the combination of egg + almond flour, though they do follow the “main” rule of food combining, which is to avoid mixing proteins and starches.

      I consider recipes like these to be “treats” and they make great options for people who are trying to transition away from processed versions made with refined sugars. The rest of my recipes on this site, including the raw dessert recipes, dressings, dips, and main entrees are all properly combined, or have notes on how to make the dish properly combined.

  • Jessica

    These sound delicious, but I’m allergic to nuts! I saw the note about not subbing with coconut flour… I’m curious about oat flour? Has anyone else tried to do it with coconut flour? And you said ‘no’ to a gf all-purpose?

  • Nikitha

    Your recipes look very tempting! I was wondering whether substituting almond flour with whole wheat produces the same result?

  • Michelle

    I made your homemade almond flour in my food processor and was itching to try it out! I decided to make this recipe, but I only made half because I didn’t know how it would turn out with my almond flour. Well, the biscuits came out great! Even without the frosting. They disappeared within minutes. Definitely making these again…SOON

  • Angie

    I made these the other day and they were delicious! I added cinnamon to the icing and oh my goodness, amazing! I’ve been eating that right out of the container and don’t feel the least bit guilty!!

  • Sharon

    I made these with flax eggs this morning and they were delicious! My 2 year old and I had them with a smoothie and we are full! Your blog has been a big help in my food allergy house. Every recipe I have tried has been great. Thank you.

  • Theresa P.

    My son and I LOVE Hardees cinnamon raisin biscuits. We’ve had them every morning for a week. I am feeling so bad because I know there are not a healthy food. I am definitely making these. I use almond flour for cookies and cakes and was looking for a recipe for biscuits, scones, breads to get totally away from wheat. your site looks like the perfect fit. Thank-you so much for sharing! it helps so many! keep doing what you do.

  • Delicious! I made mine smaller and still got 12 very nice, plump biscuits. I think they taste even better the second day. :) And I will be making some more again today without the raisins for my 8 month old…he is devouring these little treats. :) Thanks for another great recipe.

  • Anna

    Just made these tonight exactly as your recipe is shown and they are seriously delicious! Thank you for such a great recipe.

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