This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and privacy policy.

I make a big batch of fresh almond milk each week, and up until now, I’ve been at a loss for what to do with the leftover pulp.

As I understand it, much of the nutrition from the almonds is released during the blending process and transferred into the almond milk, which is why the remaining almond pulp is rather bland and lacks the texture of traditional almond flour. This is why I’ve had no issue throwing almond pulp into the compost bin up until now, but due to high demand for almond pulp recipes, I kept at it, even if the first few experiments were not very successful.

Luckily, I’ve finally come up with a solution that’s both easy and delicious.

raw cookie dough bitesRaw cookie dough bites!

These bite-sized treats feature coconut oil, almond butter and pure maple syrup, which when combined with dried almond pulp, create the texture and mouth feel of traditional cookie dough–> without any raw eggs to worry about!

As I’ve mentioned before, coconut oil, along with other healthy fats, are key to brain health and may actually boost metabolic function. Almonds not only contain additional healthy fat, but are also associated with lowering cholesterol and are a hefty source of magnesium and vitamin E. With an extra boost of fiber from the almond pulp, this naturally sweetened cookie dough is actually something you can feel good about eating!

Raw Cookie Dough Bites (Vegan)
makes 16 bite-sized pieces

Ingredients:

1 cup dried almond pulp “flour”
1/4 cup coconut oil, softened
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
6 tablespoons raw almond butter
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
dark chocolate chips, as needed

Directions:

The key to working with almond pulp is drying it first, so don’t be tempted to skip this crucial step. Trust me, I’ve tried! I use my dehydrator to dry my pulp overnight, but you could also use your oven to speed up the process. (They won’t technically be “raw” anymore, but using at temperature of 250F will dry the pulp out in an hour or so.) Once the pulp is dry, you simply pulse it in a food processor to break up any clumps and create a flour-like texture. Any leftover almond pulp “flour” can be stored as you would traditional almond flour, in a sealed container in the pantry, or in the fridge for longer shelf life.

almond pulp flour in a food processor

Measure out one cup of the almond pulp flour, using the “scoop and swipe” method: Scoop the flour with a measuring cup and swipe the top with the back of a knife to level off the top.

Combine the dried almond pulp flour with the coconut oil, almond butter, maple syrup, vanilla and sea salt in the bowl of a food processor, and pulse until a sticky, uniform batter is formed.

cookie dough mixed in a food processorAdjust the flavor to taste, if necessary, then use a tablespoon to scoop the batter into bite-sized balls. The batter may feel slightly greasy, thanks to the coconut oil melting with the warmth of the food processor, but rest assured that they will lose that greasy texture once they have set in the fridge.

Roll the batter between your hands to form a smooth shape, then arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Press the dark chocolate chips into each ball, before placing in the fridge or freezer to set.

raw cookie dough bites on a pan

I placed mine in the freezer, because I’m impatient, and I found that these were set “enough” after 10 minutes.  I actually recommend storing and serving these bites directly the freezer for best texture!

raw cookie dough bites

Note: As an added bonus, these little bite-sized bites can also be baked for a delicious cookie treat! They don’t spread like a traditional cookie, but they do get crispy on the outside and stay soft and tender on the inside. If you keep a stash of these bites in your freezer, you will only be 10 minutes away from a freshly baked chocolate chip cookie anytime you like! To bake, preheat your oven to 350F and arrange the frozen cookie dough bites on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookie bottoms are golden brown. Allow to cool for 5 minutes– they will firm up a bit– then devour!

Raw cookie dough bites

Raw Cookie Dough Bites (Vegan)

4.78 from 22 votes
These bite-sized treats feature coconut oil, almond butter and pure maple syrup, which when combined with dried almond pulp, create the texture and mouth feel of traditional cookie dough--> without any raw eggs to worry about!
prep20 mins total20 mins
Servings:16 bites

Ingredients
 
 

Instructions

  • The key to working with almond pulp is drying it first, so don't be tempted to skip this crucial step. Trust me, I've tried! Once the pulp is dry, you simply pulse it in a food processor to break up any clumps and create a flour-like texture. Any leftover almond pulp "flour" can be stored as you would traditional almond flour, in a sealed container in the pantry, or in the fridge for longer shelf life.
  • Measure out one cup of the almond pulp flour, using the "scoop and swipe" method: Scoop the flour with a measuring cup and swipe the top with the back of a knife to level off the top.
  • Combine the dried almond pulp flour with the coconut oil, almond butter, maple syrup, vanilla and sea salt in the bowl of a food processor, and pulse until a sticky, uniform batter is formed.
  • Adjust the flavor to taste, if necessary, then use a tablespoon to scoop the batter into bite-sized balls. The batter may feel slightly greasy, thanks to the coconut oil melting with the warmth of the food processor, but rest assured that they will lose that greasy texture once they have set in the fridge.
  • Roll the batter between your hands to form a smooth shape, then arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Press the dark chocolate chips into each ball, before placing in the fridge or freezer to set.
  • I placed mine in the freezer, because I'm impatient, and I found that these were set "enough" after 10 minutes. I actually recommend storing and serving these bites directly the freezer for best texture!

Notes

As an added bonus, these little bite-sized bites can also be baked for a delicious cookie treat! They don't spread like a traditional cookie, but they do get crispy on the outside and stay soft and tender on the inside. If you keep a stash of these bites in your freezer, you will only be 10 minutes away from a freshly baked chocolate chip cookie anytime you like! To bake, preheat your oven to 350F and arrange the frozen cookie dough bites on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookie bottoms are golden brown. Allow to cool for 5 minutes-- they will firm up a bit-- then devour!

Nutrition

Calories: 101kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 36mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 4g | Calcium: 20mg | Iron: 0.4mg
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: almond pulp, cookie dough, healthy, no bake, raw food
Per Serving: Calories: 101, Fat: 9g, Carbohydrates: 6g, Fiber: 1g, Protein: 2g

Hope you enjoy them!

Reader Feedback: Have you tried any other successful almond pulp recipes? If so, please share!

Megan Gilmore leaning on her white countertop.

Megan Gilmore

Hi, I’m Megan. A former fast food junkie turned best-selling cookbook author. I create healthy recipes made with simple ingredients to make your life easier.

Read More

You May Also LIke

Leave a Review!

I love hearing from you! Submit your question or review below. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked*.

Recipe Rating




This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Comments

  1. These look like the perfect treat to satisfy those sweet cravings in an undestructive way! 1 question…do I need a dehydrator to dry the almond pulp or do you just mean leave it out for a while?

    1. I do use a dehydrator, but you could probably leave it out in the sun for a few hours, if you don’t have any woodland creatures that would disturb it. 😉 Also, an oven set to low should work.

  2. These look great! I’ve been interested in making my own almond milk, but wasn’t sure about the leftovers – Would you mind sharing with me your almond milk recipe? Or the link to it? 🙂

  3. After trying homemade almond milk for the first time just the other day, I’m a little obsessed with it (the almond milk “slushy” you posted recently is wonderful!) Looking forward to making these with all the leftover pulp I’m sure to have. One question: I have a tiny hand me down food processor that can only make very small batches of things, so I’m in the market for a new regular sized one but I’m also on a super tight budget. Do you have any that you recommend?

    1. I’m not sure this is the cheapest one, but it’s the one I’ve owned for nearly 6 years, so it definitely lasts a while! http://amzn.to/XTULjE (I own the 12-cup model, but the 9 cup would be sufficient I think)

  4. These look fantastic! I’m always looking for new ways to use my leftover pulp so I’ll have to give these a try.

  5. Can you just use almond flour? or crushed up almonds? I’ve never made almond milk, plus I really want to try these tonight! Thanks.

      1. Megan,
        Interesting that you talked about the texture – when I make almond flour, I grind the pulp in the dry grains container in the vitamix, so the texture is quite flour-like. Is your almond pulp coarser?

        Thanks for the idea, these look delicious!

        1. I’m referring to the fact that the texture is not as oily, since most of the fat has been removed in the milk-making process. That’s why I’ve compensated by adding extra fat to this recipe. If you were going to use regular almond flour or meal, you wouldn’t need to use as much coconut oil or almond butter to achieve the same texture.

  6. Please tell us how to dry the pulp out! I have read where you can put it in the oven, which takes a LOT of hours. I don’t have a dehydrator, which would have been a choice.

    1. I do use my dehydrator, because I can turn it on and forget about it without worrying about burning. You can probably dry it in the oven on parchment paper at a low temperature– ideally between 200-300F– for an hour or so. Just make sure it doesn’t burn!

      1. I just tried this method for the first time yesterday and it worked great! I spread out my pulp on parchment paper and set the oven at 200*. I did check at the 30 and 45 min mark to make sure all was okay, it was fine and done after an hour. Also, I do have a question, how long does the almond pulp/flour keep?

  7. These look so yummy! I have recently started making my own almond milk and this will be the perfect way to use my almond pulp (after it’s dehydrated) of course!!

  8. It seems almost impossible to come up with a way to make the wet pulp taste good! It’s just too fluffy for my taste.

    I’ve made a granola with it, and that’s the best way I’ve found to use it, but it still requires drying it first. Your bites look delicious! I’ll have to give them a shot next. 🙂

    1. Yes, I’ve come to the conclusion that wet pulp is disgusting. I’ve tried using it so many times, and I feel like I just ruin every other ingredient that it comes into contact with! LOL

  9. I’ve mixed my leftover nut pulp (sometimes I use hazelnuts) into bread dough before. It adds a nice texture to the finished bread.

    And I am so excited to try these to satisfy my pregnancy sweet tooth! I will have to use honey instead of syrup; I live in Switzerland and the cost of maple syrup is prohibitive! Happily, the Swiss love honey.

  10. Hi Megan! When I make almond milk, I just strain it through a fine mesh strainer, which means that the “pulp” that I have left over is a little bit more wet. Can I still use this for your recipe, and how should I dry it out? Thanks!

    1. You should still be able to use it, I assume it will just take longer to dry. I use my dehydrator, but an oven set on a low setting for an hour or two should also work!