Raw Cookie Dough Bites (Vegan)

I make a big batch of fresh almond milk each week, and up until now, I’ve been at a loss for what to do with the leftover pulp.

As I understand it, much of the nutrition from the almonds is released during the blending process and transferred into the almond milk, which is why the remaining almond pulp is rather bland and lacks the texture of traditional almond flour. This is why I’ve had no issue throwing almond pulp into the compost bin up until now, but due to high demand for almond pulp recipes, I kept at it, even if the first few experiments were not very successful.

Luckily, I’ve finally come up with a solution that’s both easy and delicious.

SONY DSCRaw cookie dough bites!

These bite-sized treats feature coconut oil, almond butter and pure maple syrup, which when combined with dried almond pulp, create the texture and mouth feel of traditional cookie dough–> without any raw eggs to worry about!

As I’ve mentioned before, coconut oil, along with other healthy fats, are key to brain health and may actually boost metabolic function. Almonds not only contain additional healthy fat, but are also associated with lowering cholesterol and are a hefty source of magnesium and vitamin E. With an extra boost of fiber from the almond pulp, this naturally sweetened cookie dough is actually something you can feel good about eating!

Raw Cookie Dough Bites (Vegan)
makes 16 bite-sized pieces

Ingredients:

1 cup dried almond pulp “flour”
1/4 cup coconut oil, softened
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
6 tablespoons raw almond butter
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
dark chocolate chips, as needed

Directions:

The key to working with almond pulp is drying it first, so don’t be tempted to skip this crucial step. Trust me, I’ve tried! I use my dehydrator to dry my pulp overnight, but you could also use your oven to speed up the process. (They won’t technically be “raw” anymore, but using at temperature of 250F will dry the pulp out in an hour or so.) Once the pulp is dry, you simply pulse it in a food processor to break up any clumps and create a flour-like texture. Any leftover almond pulp “flour” can be stored as you would traditional almond flour, in a sealed container in the pantry, or in the fridge for longer shelf life.

almond pulp flour

Measure out one cup of the almond pulp flour, using the “scoop and swipe” method: Scoop the flour with a measuring cup and swipe the top with the back of a knife to level off the top.

Combine the dried almond pulp flour with the coconut oil, almond butter, maple syrup, vanilla and sea salt in the bowl of a food processor, and pulse until a sticky, uniform batter is formed.

SONY DSCAdjust the flavor to taste, if necessary, then use a tablespoon to scoop the batter into bite-sized balls. The batter may feel slightly greasy, thanks to the coconut oil melting with the warmth of the food processor, but rest assured that they will lose that greasy texture once they have set in the fridge.

Roll the batter between your hands to form a smooth shape, then arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Press the dark chocolate chips into each ball, before placing in the fridge or freezer to set.

SONY DSC

I placed mine in the freezer, because I’m impatient, and I found that these were set “enough” after 10 minutes. Β I actually recommend storing and serving these bites directly the freezer for best texture!

SONY DSC

Note: As an added bonus, these little bite-sized bites can also be baked for a delicious cookie treat! They don’t spread like a traditional cookie, but they do get crispy on the outside and stay soft and tender on the inside. If you keep a stash of these bites in your freezer, you will only be 10 minutes away from a freshly baked chocolate chip cookie anytime you like! To bake, preheat your oven to 350F and arrange the frozen cookie dough bites on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookie bottoms are golden brown. Allow to cool for 5 minutes– they will firm up a bit– then devour!

4.9 from 17 reviews
Raw Cookie Dough Bites (Vegan)
Author: 
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 16 bites
 
These bite-sized treats feature coconut oil, almond butter and pure maple syrup, which when combined with dried almond pulp, create the texture and mouth feel of traditional cookie dough--> without any raw eggs to worry about!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup dried almond pulp flour
  • ¼ cup coconut oil, softened
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 6 tablespoons raw almond butter
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • dark chocolate chips, as needed
Instructions
  1. The key to working with almond pulp is drying it first, so don't be tempted to skip this crucial step. Trust me, I've tried! Once the pulp is dry, you simply pulse it in a food processor to break up any clumps and create a flour-like texture. Any leftover almond pulp "flour" can be stored as you would traditional almond flour, in a sealed container in the pantry, or in the fridge for longer shelf life.
  2. Measure out one cup of the almond pulp flour, using the "scoop and swipe" method: Scoop the flour with a measuring cup and swipe the top with the back of a knife to level off the top.
  3. Combine the dried almond pulp flour with the coconut oil, almond butter, maple syrup, vanilla and sea salt in the bowl of a food processor, and pulse until a sticky, uniform batter is formed.
  4. Adjust the flavor to taste, if necessary, then use a tablespoon to scoop the batter into bite-sized balls. The batter may feel slightly greasy, thanks to the coconut oil melting with the warmth of the food processor, but rest assured that they will lose that greasy texture once they have set in the fridge.
  5. Roll the batter between your hands to form a smooth shape, then arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Press the dark chocolate chips into each ball, before placing in the fridge or freezer to set.
  6. I placed mine in the freezer, because I'm impatient, and I found that these were set "enough" after 10 minutes. I actually recommend storing and serving these bites directly the freezer for best texture!
Notes
As an added bonus, these little bite-sized bites can also be baked for a delicious cookie treat! They don't spread like a traditional cookie, but they do get crispy on the outside and stay soft and tender on the inside. If you keep a stash of these bites in your freezer, you will only be 10 minutes away from a freshly baked chocolate chip cookie anytime you like! To bake, preheat your oven to 350F and arrange the frozen cookie dough bites on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookie bottoms are golden brown. Allow to cool for 5 minutes-- they will firm up a bit-- then devour!

Hope you enjoy them!

Reader Feedback: Have you tried any other successful almond pulp recipes? If so, please share!

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Meet Megan Gilmore

Hi, I’m Megan. A former fast food junkie turned certified nutritionist consultant, trying to make healthy living as easy as possible. I believe in eating delicious whole foods on a regular basis to help naturally support the body’s detox organsβ€” no juice fasting required. (Unless you want to!) If you make one of my healthy recipes, tag @detoxinista on Instagram or Facebook so I can see!

104 thoughts on “Raw Cookie Dough Bites (Vegan)

  1. Jennifer

    Hi Megan! When I make almond milk, I just strain it through a fine mesh strainer, which means that the “pulp” that I have left over is a little bit more wet. Can I still use this for your recipe, and how should I dry it out? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Megan Post author

      You should still be able to use it, I assume it will just take longer to dry. I use my dehydrator, but an oven set on a low setting for an hour or two should also work!

      Reply
  2. Steph

    I’ve mixed my leftover nut pulp (sometimes I use hazelnuts) into bread dough before. It adds a nice texture to the finished bread.

    And I am so excited to try these to satisfy my pregnancy sweet tooth! I will have to use honey instead of syrup; I live in Switzerland and the cost of maple syrup is prohibitive! Happily, the Swiss love honey.

    Reply
  3. Lauren

    It seems almost impossible to come up with a way to make the wet pulp taste good! It’s just too fluffy for my taste.

    I’ve made a granola with it, and that’s the best way I’ve found to use it, but it still requires drying it first. Your bites look delicious! I’ll have to give them a shot next. πŸ™‚

    Reply
    1. Megan Post author

      Yes, I’ve come to the conclusion that wet pulp is disgusting. I’ve tried using it so many times, and I feel like I just ruin every other ingredient that it comes into contact with! LOL

      Reply
  4. Linda

    Please tell us how to dry the pulp out! I have read where you can put it in the oven, which takes a LOT of hours. I don’t have a dehydrator, which would have been a choice.

    Reply
    1. Megan Post author

      I do use my dehydrator, because I can turn it on and forget about it without worrying about burning. You can probably dry it in the oven on parchment paper at a low temperature– ideally between 200-300F– for an hour or so. Just make sure it doesn’t burn!

      Reply
      1. Rebecca

        I just tried this method for the first time yesterday and it worked great! I spread out my pulp on parchment paper and set the oven at 200*. I did check at the 30 and 45 min mark to make sure all was okay, it was fine and done after an hour. Also, I do have a question, how long does the almond pulp/flour keep?

        Reply
  5. Michelle

    Can you just use almond flour? or crushed up almonds? I’ve never made almond milk, plus I really want to try these tonight! Thanks.

    Reply
      1. Laura

        Megan,
        Interesting that you talked about the texture – when I make almond flour, I grind the pulp in the dry grains container in the vitamix, so the texture is quite flour-like. Is your almond pulp coarser?

        Thanks for the idea, these look delicious!

        Reply
        1. Megan Post author

          I’m referring to the fact that the texture is not as oily, since most of the fat has been removed in the milk-making process. That’s why I’ve compensated by adding extra fat to this recipe. If you were going to use regular almond flour or meal, you wouldn’t need to use as much coconut oil or almond butter to achieve the same texture.

          Reply
  6. Britt

    After trying homemade almond milk for the first time just the other day, I’m a little obsessed with it (the almond milk “slushy” you posted recently is wonderful!) Looking forward to making these with all the leftover pulp I’m sure to have. One question: I have a tiny hand me down food processor that can only make very small batches of things, so I’m in the market for a new regular sized one but I’m also on a super tight budget. Do you have any that you recommend?

    Reply
  7. Meagan

    These look great! I’ve been interested in making my own almond milk, but wasn’t sure about the leftovers – Would you mind sharing with me your almond milk recipe? Or the link to it? πŸ™‚

    Reply
  8. Emma

    These look like the perfect treat to satisfy those sweet cravings in an undestructive way! 1 question…do I need a dehydrator to dry the almond pulp or do you just mean leave it out for a while?

    Reply
    1. Megan Post author

      I do use a dehydrator, but you could probably leave it out in the sun for a few hours, if you don’t have any woodland creatures that would disturb it. πŸ˜‰ Also, an oven set to low should work.

      Reply
  9. Kelly

    Can you use almond meal instead of leftover pulp? I don’t make my own almond milk. But I am dying to try these.

    Reply
    1. Megan Post author

      Squeezing it is definitely not sufficient, it has to be very, very dry. If you have a dehydrator, I just spread the crumbled almond pulp onto a teflex sheet and crank the temperature to 120, leaving it there until I remember to check on it again! With the dehydrator, you don’t really have to worry about over-drying it, so you could let it dry overnight if you wanted to.

      Reply
  10. Crystal

    These are so tasty, judging by what I licked off my spatula. πŸ™‚ The batter is setting in my freezer right now. I make coconut/almond milk blend and I use the pulp in my daughter’s oatmeal, and to make chocolate cookies. Thank you for another delish recipe!

    Reply
  11. jodye @ chocolate and chou fleur

    I’m a fan of anything cookie dough related, and this looks like a perfect healthy alternative to the regular butter and sugar laden cookie dough. I’ve been planning to make some almond milk, so I know where my almond pup will be going!

    Reply
  12. chris

    How can you determine the nutrition fact of almond pulp? I presume it is different than almond flour. THanks!

    Reply
  13. Elizabeth

    I made these last night! Perfect timing–they were delicious! I added some flax seed meal to make them even healthier. Yum!! Thank you!!

    Reply
  14. Holly

    You are brilliant!!!!!!!! Thanks for taking the time to keep us all happy and answer all our questions and think of amazing recipes!!!!!!! This is my favorite food blog and believe me, I follow a TON of them!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
    1. Megan Post author

      I make 5 cups for myself, which lasts a week. Sometimes I have to make double that, if my husband is interested in almond milk that week, too.

      Reply
  15. Randi

    We made these similar, but added oats and used the pulp still wet. I refrigerated it over night. Maybe used a bit more coconut oil. Worked really well. So yummy. My kids liked it just as well as regular cookie dough.

    Reply
  16. Jessica M.

    This recipe looks easy and good! One question. I’ve never worked with almond pulp flour… can this recipe be used with just almond flour?? I don’t even know what almond pulp flour is. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  17. Mary Pichotta

    I made these this morning. They are really, really good. I just dried my pulp in the oven at 200 degrees for a couple of hours and it dried out. My 2 and 4 year olds like these too. Thanks for the great recipe.

    Reply
  18. Alissa

    Made these last night and they are really good! They taste just like cookie dough!
    I like to use my almond meal with juice pulp in my raw breads and crackers. It works out well, I think, because I like to put flax in my milk for a thicker milk and because my blender isn’t the best so the flax doesn’t all get broken up.

    Reply
  19. Susan

    Made these today with my leftover almond pulp and they are so delicious! Even my husband (who doesn’t like sweets) thinks they’re great.

    Reply
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  21. Letitia

    hey! I just made these! they taste great! I used raw honey instead of maple syrup and the only thing i would do differently is a lot less coconut oil, half as much. when i processed them they were so oily that it never came to a uniform batter, it looked more like wet brown sugar along the sides.. i even added more almond pulp to fix this. and when forming the balls the coconut oil was dripping from my hands. I stuck it our rolled them around got em in the freezer and they tasted good. flat layer of frozen oil on the bottom of each ball so def less oil next time <3

    Reply
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  27. Lisa O

    I made these just as written but used cacao nibs instead of chocolate chips. Came out great! Thanks for the recipe! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  28. Haley

    I am allergic to coconut, is there a different oil that can be used in these? (and your other recipes that call for coconut oil?)

    Reply
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  30. Veera1

    Thank you for this recipe. I just made these and they turned out perfect. The best way to use almond pulp so far! I really like your blog, it is a great inspiration and source of information. Greetings from Finland!

    Reply
  31. Lynn Niel

    Made these today and they are great! In fact, I consider it a miracle that my sugar loving hubby said he loved them. His “go to” snack is toll house cookie dough, so this is a huge step… thank you!!!

    Reply
  32. sonia

    I love them! MAde a couple of changes to the recipe though )because I did not have all the ingredients. First I completed the dried (in the oven 110 celsius for an hour + left in the turned off oven for the night) almond pulp with a little coconut flour, then, I substitute a mix of agave syrup and date syrup for the maple syrup. It tastes delicious!Definitely the kind of recipe I want to keep and share with my daughter. Thank you!

    Reply
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  34. Adrienne

    Wow these are great! Thanks for the tips on how to successfully make almond flour. I tried in my oven once and burned it, but it worked perfectly in my dehydrator. Great treat for that leftover almond pulp!

    Reply
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  37. Matt

    I mixed everything together. Kept them in the fridge for some time, and they were hard. Put them in the oven for 10 minutes, and they flattened out. They did not hold their shape. They flattened out more than traditional cookies. So much, I ended up having one big cookie. Any advice for the future?

    Reply
  38. Chuck

    I tried this recipe. I had 3 cups of dried ground almond flour, so I tripled the recipe. It was swimming in oil. I don’t think the coconut oil was necessary. The ground raw almond butter had plenty of oil in it. I’d probably not use maple syrup again. I think brown sugar or palm sugar would work better.

    The dough is pretty much impossible to mix. The food processor didn’t work. The bread dough hook on my mixer didn’t work. Finally dumped it into a bowl and used a potato masher to try and mix it.

    This recipe needs more work.

    Reply
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  41. Kristyn

    I love these cookie dough cookies. I freeze the cookies for a treat but I also bring them to my triathlon trainings as a “goo” to help give me the needed energy to complete my workouts (my diet forbids processed sugar, flour, etc. so I can’t have any of the goo’s or other energy snacks that other athletes carry with them). I put less coconut oil in mine as they came out a little oily the first time I made them. I’ve also been adding all sorts of other yummy healthy stuff to my dough (maca powder, hemp protein, and I make my milks from almond, walnut and hemp hearts so the flour I use is a little different). My husband begged me to put cinnamon in my last batch (he loves cinnamon and its many nutritional benefits) and they tasted great. Thanks so much for this awesome recipe. I’ve tagged it on my site as other Crohn’s and Colitis sufferers have been asking about the “goo” recipe I’ve been using for my workouts.

    Reply
  42. Chrissy

    Can cashew butter be substituted for the almond butter? These look delicious, and I’m finally getting into making my own almond milk, need something to do with the pulp…gluten free goodies are right up my ally. Thanks!

    Reply
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  45. Mel

    Thank you so much for sharing your recipes! I have just recently started making my own almond milk, it’s great to find some recipes that I can use the pulp in. I have cut out sugars, so used a bit of stevia instead of maple syrup and they worked out beautifully. I baked these, but will try them as cookie dough bites another time. Very happy to have a yummy sweet biscuit! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  46. Mary LaVeau

    I made my first batch of almond milk and love it! I want to dry and use the pulp as you mentioned. Are there pulp drying suggestions? I was just going to spread it in a glass baking dish and leave it on the counter. How long does it typically take to dry?

    Reply
  47. Amy

    I just made these and they were great – I too have been ruining everything I bake by trying to sneak more and more wet almond pulp into it! Thanks for the recipe. I used peanut butter instead of almond butter because that’s what I had and baked them.

    The only problem is that they really tasted best with a glass of homemade almond milk = never ending cycle!!

    Reply
  48. Kristina Johnson

    The almond pulp flour comes from the leftover almonds after making almond milk? How do I let it try out?

    Reply
  49. Suzanne Holt

    I was looking for an edible cookie dough recipe because the kids always try to eat the dough when I’m making cookies, but we know it’s bad for them. Do these still have a very strong almond flavor?

    Reply
  50. Hannah

    K so what if we don’t mind the raw egg factor. Would that cut down on the amount of oil used? Coconut oil is expensive and raw eggs can be nutritious! Thanks!

    Reply
  51. Carolyn

    These are delicious! I used organic chunky peanut butter because that’s what I had on hand. Just froze them as directed and ate them!!

    Reply
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  54. Monica

    I have made these many times and I love them. Made them today oil and sugar free by substituting apple sauce and date paste for the coconut oil and maple syrup. Gave them to my 8 year old daughter and she loved them. Me too!

    Reply
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  56. Technus

    These are delicious! I took them to a party and they were a hit. They are a bit oily so I may reduce the coconut oil in my next batch. I’ve tried making cookies with wet almond pulp and they were not very good, lol. I guess drying it out is the best way to go.

    Reply
  57. Laura

    Loved this recipe. Pleasantly surprised actually, but after being chastised by the DH (he thinks it’s better to abstain than try to substitute, I say a girl needs a little cookie dough now and then) He gave his seal of approval. This is good stuff. πŸ™‚

    Reply
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  59. Jodi

    I used to dry the pulp and add it to the granola I made, thinking there was still some protein in it, but sounds like maybe not. I no longer have a dehydrator and have taken a break from making granola….it takes a bit of time and doesn’t save much $$, so now I just add the wet pulp to my smoothies. Or freeze it to use later.

    Reply
  60. gayle fried

    I make homemade granola with the pulp and it is excellent. My kid loves it. You can even use the pulp wet. The trick is putting it in the oven on low for a long time (i.e. mimic a dehydrator).

    Recipe:
    Almond pulp (i sweeten my almond milk with a touch of vanilla, cinammon, and dates before blending)
    Raisins and other dried fruit
    Oats
    a bit more Cinammon and vanilla
    Maple syrup to bind together (and for taste)

    Spread in thin layer on cookie sheet. Press down with hands so that it all sticks together on the cookie sheet. Put in oven on medium-low (on convection works great too) for at least 45 minutes to an hour. You want to mimic a dehydrator (but careful not burn it or too long it will be too dry).

    Break up and use as cookies or granola. Excellent!

    Reply
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  64. Em

    Meghan, lovely lovely lovely site you’ve given us!!

    I make biscotti with the leftover almond pulp from making almond milk. just freeze it and bake biscotti whenyou have a good cup or so . comes out wonderfully!

    ciao,
    em

    Reply
  65. Rachel

    At work we make homemade almond milk and put vanilla and dates (sometimes maple syrup and raw cacao too) and then blend and strain, leaving a moist, almost thick nut buttery mixture that can be rolled into balls and eaten immediately like bliss balls , and you can eat twice as much because it’s not as dense as plain nut butter (that’s my logic anyways)

    Reply
  66. Janessa

    tried this with “raw” almond pulp and no oil (to make up for the extra wetness) and it worked out pretty good. Close to the consistency of the actual recipe (which I also tried). I put it on top of my chocolate smoothies as “cookie dough”. Great way to use almond pulp raw as long as your willing to eat it as frozen as possible. Also good with dried pb2 in there to whip out some moisture and get more dough-y consistence… even though peanut butter really isn’t the best thing in the world.

    Reply
  67. Laurel

    Hi Detoxinista! Do you have any recommendations for leftover coconut pulp? So far I’ve made granola. I want to try macaroons too. What do you think?

    Reply
  68. Kathleen

    I made these today with peanut butter instead of almond butter and a little more sea salt. They were delicious!! I only wish I had more!

    Reply
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  70. Bob

    i want to dry out my almond pulp and use it but I’m not sure how to dry it since I do not have dehydrator? Can you explain the best way to do it?

    Reply
  71. Michele

    I just found your site and this was the first recipe I tried. These were delicious. I tried one baked and the others raw. Will definitely make again and have found other recipes that sound great too

    Reply
  72. Leslie

    Excellent recipe! I always feel so wasteful throwing away the almond pulp so I’m thankful for a good use for it! I also try to keep a sock of healthy raw desserts in my freezer for any sweet tooth cravings and this is perfect for sweet little snacks.
    Thank you for the wonderful recipes!

    Reply

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