“Everything Bagel” Buns

If you love “everything” bagels, you’re in luck.

everything bagel buns on a plate

My friend, Ali, has come up with a healthier way to enjoy the flavor of everything bagels, without the refined flour and gluten found in the traditional variety. In her new cookbook, Inspiralized, Ali shares a variety of creative ways to use a spiralizer to add more veggies into your diet. In addition to these “bagel buns,” her cookbook also shares innovative recipes like Blueberry Sweet Potato Waffles, Spicy Shrimp Lettuce Wraps with Coconut-Lime Jicama Rice, Vegetarian Carrot Enchilada Bake, Fennel Sausage and Butternut Squash Casserole, and Chocolate Chip Sweet Potato Muffins.

inspiralized cookbook

If you’re not familiar with a spiralizer, it’s a handy kitchen tool that easily turns vegetables into “noodles.” Replacing the traditional pasta in your favorite dish with vegetable pasta is an easy swap you can make to increase your vegetable intake, without giving up the flavors you love. (Most of the flavor is in the sauce and toppings, anyway!)

But you don’t have to stop at just pasta. As you can see from the recipe below, you can do all sorts of things with spiraled vegetables! Thanks to Ali for allowing me to share a recipe from her cookbook. I hope you all enjoy it!

“Everything Bagel” Buns
Makes 4 buns

Ingredients:

For the bagel mix:

1 teaspoon poppy seeds
1 teaspoon sesame seeds
1 1/4 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

For the buns:

Cooking spray or 1 teaspoon olive oil
1 large Idaho potato, peeled, spiralized with Blade C (to make spaghetti-like noodles)*
Salt & pepper
1 large egg and 1 egg white, lightly beaten
1 tablespoons olive oil

*I used a large parsnip, instead of a potato, which also worked great!

Directions:

1. Make the bagel mix. Combine the ingredients in a small bowl and set aside.

2. Make the buns. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and coat with cooking spray, or olive oil. (I used a teaspoon of olive oil, instead of cooking spray.) When water flicked onto the skillet sizzles, add the potato noodles and season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook, tossing occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the potatoes are golden brown. (When using a parsnip, I had to sauté the noodles for closer to 15-20 minutes to get them tender.) Transfer to a large bowl and allow to cool for 2 minutes.

making everything bagel buns with a spiralizer

3. Stir in the eggs and bagel mix. Toss until the potato noodles are evenly coated. Fill four 6-ounce ramekins halfway with the potato noodles. Cover each with a piece of wax paper, pressing it firmly down onto the potato noodles to compress them. Refrigerate for at least 15 minutes to set.

4. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the buns two at a time, flipping each out of its ramekin into the skillet and patting the bottom until the bun falls out. Cook for 3 minutes or until set, being sure to push in any stray noodles. Carefully flip and cook another 2 to 3 minutes or until the buns are completely set and browned on both sides. Repeat with the other ramekins, adding the remaining tablespoon of oil as needed.

spiralized bagel buns on a plate

5. Serve the bagel buns with the spreads and toppings of your choice.

4.75 from 4 votes
Print
"Everything Bagel" Buns
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
5 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
A vegetable-based "bagel" that is naturally gluten-free!
Course: Breakfast
Servings: 4
Calories: 100 kcal
Author: Detoxinista.com
Ingredients
For the bagel mix:
  • 1 teaspoon poppy seeds
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
For the buns:
  • Cooking spray
  • 1 large Idaho potato , peeled, spiraled with Blade C (to make spaghetti-like noodles)*
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 large egg and 1 egg white , lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoons olive oil
Instructions
  1. Make the bagel mix. Combine the ingredients in a small bowl and set aside.
  2. Make the buns. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and coat with cooking spray, or olive oil. (I used a teaspoon of olive oil, instead of cooking spray.) When water flicked onto the skillet sizzles, add the potato noodles and season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook, tossing occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the potatoes are golden brown. (When using a parsnip, I had to sauté the noodles for closer to 15-20 minutes to get them tender.) Transfer to a large bowl and allow to cool for 2 minutes.
  3. Stir in the eggs and bagel mix. Toss until the potato noodles are evenly coated. Fill four 6-ounce ramekins halfway with the potato noodles. Cover each with a piece of wax paper, pressing it firmly down onto the potato noodles to compress them. Refrigerate for at least 15 minutes to set.
  4. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the buns two at a time, flipping each out of its ramekin into the skillet and patting the bottom until the bun falls out. Cook for 3 minutes or until set, being sure to push in any stray noodles. Carefully flip and cook another 2 to 3 minutes or until the buns are completely set and browned on both sides. Repeat with the other ramekins, adding the remaining tablespoon of oil as needed.
  5. Serve the bagel buns with the spreads and toppings of your choice.
Recipe Notes

*I used a large parsnip, instead of a potato, which also worked great!

Re-printed with permission from Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals, by Ali Maffucci.

Notes:

As I mentioned above, I made this recipe using parsnips, instead of potato, because that’s what I had on hand. The resulting “bagels” were delicious, and I have a feeling you could use this method with a variety of other vegetables, too. As always, please leave a comment below if you have success making a substitution, so that we can all benefit from your experience. Enjoy!

Reader Feedback: Do you own a spiralizer? If so, what’s your favorite way to use it?

Disclosure: Ali sent me a complimentary copy of her cookbook, but I am under no obligation to post a positive review. I asked her if I could share this recipe with you guys, and I appreciate her letting me do so! 

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Comments

Laura ~ Raise Your Garden

The old me used to swing by this coffee shop called Tim Hortons where I live and get a bagel and iced capp everyday. When I think about how much sugar I was consuming, just scary. Not to mention packing on the pounds! It’s been about 7 years since I’ve had a traditional bagel because as you know, they’re really not good for you. So I find this idea so inspiring. I like the Yukon potatoes but also feel compelled to try the parsnip. (I’m new to those these days.) The poppy and sesame seeds sound absolutely fantastic, really giving off the bagel feel. No spiralizer here yet, but I think it’s time! I feel like I’m missing out on too many recipes.

Kayla

What a cool and interesting recipe idea! I would have never thought of something like this. I’ll have to check out the recipe book. Thanks for sharing!

Mary

I am a bagel addict! I try to stay clear, but usually have one every few days. THIS may be just what I need. Thank you! I have the “veggetti” spiralizer, so I have no excuse to not make these! I wonder if they would keep in the freezer or even just the fridge for a few days?

Josie

These ‘bagels’ kinda look like latkes. I love my spiralizer and this seems like a super easy recipe to change up the usual raw noodles that I eat. Thanks

Cindy

What a great idea! Will have to try this. I do have a spiralizer! I have only used a few times but I think I will be using a lot more. I have made “pasta salad” with zucchini. Love the idea of using parsnips – I bought some recently to make your parsnip chips but haven’t yet. I need to get busy! 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

Natasha

Looks really good! A fabulous idea… But do you think it would work with a flax egg? Thanks

    Lu

    flax egg won’t hold it together, you can use chickpea flour, I think that would do the trick. good luck!

      Mary lou

      How much chickpea flour? Do you need some liquid added as well? Baking powder to make it rise? Thanks!

Abbi*tarian

Brilliant!! Thanks to your friend Ali for coming up with this recipe, & thank you for sharing it! I don’t have a spiralizer, so I’m just going to try to do a thick grate or thin julienne with my new & so far unused mandoline, & then put the batter in my donut pans. This recipe definitely sounds like it will work well with most any root veggie & maybe some squashes, too. I’m looking forward to fun experiments, ahead :0).

kezia @ Super Naturally Healthy

I would never have thought of this so great shout – I am going to start using my spiraliser for a whole lot more other than courgette noodles!!

Maggie

Are you suppose to combine potatoes with eggs?

    Megan Gilmore

    No, Ali’s book doesn’t follow food combining rules, so this recipe isn’t properly combined. That’s another reason why I used parsnips, because many people consider those a “neutral” vegetable for food combining, so they’d digest better with the egg.

Kate

These look amazing and I want to try to make them! I’m curious if anyone has had luck making these without eggs?

Ellen

I don’t have a spiralizer, so I just shredded the potato in my food processor. It worked okay, but was really wet, so I ended up baking them after I pan fried them. Yum!

    Isabella

    When shredding potatoes, put them
    Thru a potato ricer to squeeze out excess starch. This may help you. This works great for removing excess liquid from frozen spinach also fyi. Alton Brown has awesome hash brown recipe I make. Google it

    I have to get a spiralizer. This recipe looks great Megan. Thank you!

Dana

Loved these. I tweaked the recipe a little . I used a white sweet potato. I used 1/2 onion powder and 1/2 tsp minced onion. I sautéed the buns I coconut oil.

Brynda

Wondering if I could bake them instead of fry them. Thoughts????

    Daphne

    My first use of my spiralizer today and I was short of time so I omitted chilling in ramekins, and instead baked mine in muffin rings on a greased baking tray for 15 minutes. Turned out great, delicious.

Theresa

The recipe looks awesome. I will have to try it.

I cannot eat eggs of any kind. Recently I discovered an awesome website that you can find items that are free of multiple allergens.You pick your allergen or allergens, and it will give you a list of items that you can eat.

Example: http://www.vinemarket.com/p/neat-egg-substitute-vegan-1180011?qid=305293240110792896&sr=1-1 — this is an egg replacement that uses chia seeds and garbanzo beans. The site is vinemarket.com.

The 7 allergens are dairy, egg, gluten, nuts, peanuts, kosher, and free of 8 major food allergens. They also have items that are made in facilities that are tree nut free, peanut free, or nut free.

I hope this helps someone!

    Mary lou

    Thank you for posting this! Between my daughter and I, we need to avoid almost 30 foods, incl dairy, soy, gluten, egg and corn. I will check this out!

Crystal

Hi, there! This is a great idea! I used carrots, with cinnamon, vanilla (mixed in w/ the eggs), and chia seeds. Mine sat in the fridge overnight in the ramekin Tastes like french toast! =)

Sandra

Wonderful recipe. Is the nutritional information available?

Tonicarol

I used a sweet potato because that’s what I had and it was still good. Going to try the parsnip next. I have her first book and still have only made recipes from her blog but this along with the pizza skillet made me reopen it!

    Tonicarol

    Oh topped it with goat yogurt which was amazing ?

Jacquelyn

Do you think it would taste okay with sweet potatoes instead of regular potatoes? I’m following paleo diet.

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