Gluten-Free Vegan Pumpkin Scones with Creamy Maple Glaze

The restaurant I worked at throughout college changed my life. I think it would be amazing if everyone had the chance to work in the service industry at some point, because it definitely teaches you a thing or two about how you should treat other people, and gives you more patience than you ever had before.

pumpkin scones with creamy maple glaze on top

Working in a restaurant also taught me to love REAL food. Up until that point, I pretty much relied on drive-thru windows and packaged foods you could pop in a toaster or microwave. I was a “picky” eater in the sense that I didn’t stray outside of my usual convenience foods. However, being a server changed all of that, because I had to taste the specials each night– and I realized that made-from-scratch salad dressings and sauces tasted way better than the bottled versions I was accustomed to.

Many of the recipes you’ll find here on the blog are inspired by dishes we served at that restaurant, including these scones. Our in-house baker would show up at 3am to whip up scones from scratch every morning, and they were the best I’d ever tasted. I’d describe them as a cross between a biscuit and a muffin– slightly moist like a muffin, but still crumbly and almost flaky, like a biscuit. These vegan and gluten-free scones aren’t quite as decadent, but they make a delicious Fall treat that won’t leave you with a morning sugar crash later.

I hope you’ll enjoy them!

Gluten-Free Vegan Pumpkin Scones
Makes 8 to 9 scones

Ingredients:

Pumpkin Scones:
2 cups gluten-free oat flour*
1 cup coconut sugar
1/2 cup coconut oil, chilled
1/2 cup pumpkin puree
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

Creamy Maple Glaze:
2 tablespoons raw cashew butter
1 tablespoon arrowroot starch
1 tablespoon maple syrup
2 to 3 teaspoons water

*Note: You can make your own oat flour by simply grinding gluten-free rolled oats in a blender or food processor. 

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350ºF and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner. In the bowl of a large food processor fitted with an “S” blade, process together the flour, sugar, and coconut oil until crumbly. Add in the pumpkin, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt and baking soda and process again until a thick dough is formed. Add in the vinegar last, and process once more to incorporate it thoroughly.

preparing pumpkin scone dough in a food processor and cooking it on a baking sheet

Use a heaping 1/4 cup to scoop the dough and drop it into 8 or 9 evenly-sized mounds on the lined baking sheet. Bake until the centers of the scones are firm to the touch and your kitchen is filled with a fragrant Fall scent, about 20 minutes. Allow the scones to cool completely before topping with the Creamy Maple Glaze.

To prepare the glaze, stir together the cashew butter, arrowroot, maple syrup and 2 teaspoons of water. Add more water if needed to thin, then spoon the glaze over each scone and serve. Thanks to the use of arrowroot, this glaze will “set” to an extent, similar to a glaze made with powdered sugar, after a few hours. (I noticed the glaze was dry to the touch after 4 hours.)

pumpkin scones with creamy maple glaze on top

These scones can be stored at room temperature for up to 3 days, or in the fridge for up to one week.

4.8 from 5 votes
Print
Gluten-Free Vegan Pumpkin Scones with Creamy Maple Glaze
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 

These scones are a delicious fall treat perfect for breakfast!

Course: Breakfast
Servings: 8
Calories: 348 kcal
Author: Detoxinista.com
Ingredients
Pumpkin Scones:
Creamy Maple Glaze:
  • 2 tablespoons raw cashew butter
  • 1 tablespoon arrowroot
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons water
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner. In the bowl of a large food processor fitted with an "S" blade, process together the flour, sugar, and coconut oil until crumbly. Add in the pumpkin, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt and baking soda and process again until a thick dough is formed. Add in the vinegar last, and process once more to incorporate it thoroughly.
  2. Use a heaping 1/4 cup to scoop the dough and drop it into 8 evenly-sized mounds on the lined baking sheet. Bake until the centers of the scones are firm to the touch and your kitchen is filled with a fragrant Fall scent, about 20 minutes. Allow the scones to cool completely before topping with the Creamy Maple Glaze.
  3. To prepare the glaze, stir together the cashew butter, arrowroot, maple syrup and 2 teaspoons of water. Add more water if needed to thin, then spoon the glaze over each scone and serve. Thanks to the use of arrowroot, this glaze will "set" to an extent, similar to a glaze made with powdered sugar, after a few hours. (I noticed the glaze was dry to the touch after 4 hours.)
  4. These scones can be stored at room temperature for up to 3 days, or in the fridge for up to one week.
Recipe Notes

*You can make your own oat flour by simply grinding gluten-free rolled oats in a blender or food processor.

Note: If you want to keep these scones nut-free, use sunflower butter instead of cashew butter in the glaze, or omit it all together. The scones are delicious on their own! For those following proper food combining, these scones are considered a starch if you omit the glaze.

Reader Feedback: Have you ever worked in a restaurant? If so, what was your favorite dish on the menu? 

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Comments

Kayla

These sound yummy! I love fall and these scones scream fall. Thanks for the recipe!

Gwen

Have you tried using raw honey instead of coconut sugar

    Megan Gilmore

    Nope, I haven’t tried that! I know a lot of people don’t like cooking with honey because its health properties might be damaged, so I’ve stopped using it recently and only use it in my no-bake recipes now.

      Maureen

      Hi Megan,
      Thanks for always having such wonderful recipes. The one issue I’m confused abut and encountering a lot lately is seeing so much coconut sugar in recipes. The research I’ve done has lead me to believe that while coconut sugar has more nutrients than white sugar the nutrient content is still minimal (you would have to eat more than is healthy to actually gain any nutritional value) and that coconut sugar is ultimately no better than white sugar. So, while honey loses its health properties when cooked, I still feel better using a sweetener directly for nature rather than one that is processed. I’d love to know what your thoughts are on this or if you could direct me to any information on the contrary. Thanks again for the work you do, it’s definitely improved my quality of life and made eating healthy so much more enjoyable.

        Megan Gilmore

        I tend to use coconut sugar in certain baked goods simply because the results are SO MUCH better. Sometimes you just need a granulated sweetener for certain textures, and date sugar doesn’t cut it. I do prefer to use raw honey and dates whenever possible, but there are some schools of thought that think honey actually becomes toxic when heated. I’m not sure I buy into that that, as there’s not enough research to say either way, but you can read another opinion here: http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/is-cooking-honey-unhealthy/

      tali

      can ן use almond flour or coconut flour instead?

Jen

These look great! Wondering if I can use another nut butter for the glaze? Thanks!

    Megan Gilmore

    Another nut butter will change the flavor slightly, but I think you could definitely use a different one with delicious results!

Nui

Hi Megan! Can I ask you why do you always use baking soda instead of baking powder? Sometimes baking soda leaves bitter taste. So I was wondering if I can just use baking powder..

    Megan Gilmore

    Baking powder usually has some sort of starch added to the mix, which makes it less allergy-friendly. It used to be wheat starch was added, so it wasn’t safe for gluten-free consumers, but now it’s more common to use cornstarch– which is still not ideal for those who need to remain grain-free or are sensitive to corn. I find it’s more straight-forward to just use baking soda with some sort of acid, like vinegar for a similar effect. Baking soda shouldn’t be bitter if you use the right amount of acid with it. (Usually double the amount of acid to baking soda.)

Platt College

Pumpkin scones, just in time for Halloween!

Nina

I got 5 1/2 c scones, not 8☹️️
They smell so good, though.
I don’t have arrowroot or cornstarch-could I use coconut oil?

    Megan Gilmore

    Well, now I’m wondering if I got my measuring cups mixed up, so I’ll adjust the recipe to use a smaller measure for dropping the scones. I do hope you enjoy them! I’m not sure how coconut oil will affect the glaze– it would firm up if chilled, but not necessarily at room temperature. (It will depend on how cold your house is.) Let us know what you try!

      Holly

      Yes, I got 5 also, so I just made smaller scones. Wonderful recipe though! Made the house smell amazing!

Milissa

I worked in a fine dining restaurant in college and also learned so much about food and to get out of my comfort zone! Here’s something funny–I’ve been making gluten-free pumpkin scones for a few years now! I use natural cane and brown sugar instead of coconut sugar and frozen vegan butter and they are so nice when it’s chilly in the morning! We love them with hot herbal tea or apple cider. Oh, I add some fresh apple cider to the batter as well!

Cecilia

Absolutely delicious and make the house smell amazing!!

Rebecca

These sound wonderful? Could you use Almond flour instead of the oat flour?

TK

Made these and they are DELICIOUS!! Will use a smaller scoop size. I made only six. No Biggie. They are Awesome! I am making another batch tomorrow. The house smelled Great as they were baking!!

Ren

I made these and we devoured them – fantastic! I did, like a couple other commenters mentioned, only get 6 out of the recipe, and that was with a smaller measuring cup (1/3 cup each scoop). Super easy recipe and delicious – will be making them again! Thanks!

Cam

This recipe is fantastic! I have made 3 different batches. I made first batch as written, second batch I added chocolate chips and the third batch I used banana in place of pumpkin, added cocoa powder, craisins and pepitas and they all turned out beautifully delicious!! Thanks Megan, I love your recipes, always so simple and call for ingredients I have on hand.

Francine Brown

This recipe looks delicious have you tried it without the oat flour. I have celiac disease and I am too sensitive to oat due to it’s high cross contamination issues. I would love to try this I am just not certain of the oat flour’s texture and consistency compared to other flours.

Laura

Just made them for the second time this morning. SO good! I used almond butter in the icing and turned out good.

Scott

Just made these delicious scones. Using the 1/4 cup measure I ended up with 10. Since I didn’t have arrowroot I used tapioca flour in the topping.

Theresa

I am allergic to OATS can you use another flour instead?

    Megan Gilmore

    I haven’t tried it with another flour yet, but please let us know if you do!

Carly

AMAZING. Seriously, just amazing. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! I followed it to the tee except for I didn’t have just clove and ginger so i added 1 tsp and 1/2 of pumpkin spice.

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