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Almond Flour Pizza Crust

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This Almond Flour Pizza Crust is super-easy to prepare, and is the perfect pizza crust alternative if you’re looking for something gluten-free and grain-free. It’s inspired by one of my favorite box mixes (by Simple Mills), and happens to be vegan, too!

sliced of pizza lifted up on a spatula

Can you Substitute Almond Flour for Regular Flour?

If you’ve ever tried making your own almond flour pizza crust, by using a recipe that calls for regular flour, you might have noticed that things usually need to be adjusted when you swap it for almond flour.

Almond flour is higher in protein and fat, so you’ll typically need less oil than a traditional recipe might call for.

Since almond flour is gluten-free, it doesn’t naturally bind the way regular flour would, either. That’s why many almond flour recipes call for an egg, or egg substitute.

In this case, I add arrowroot starch and ground flax seed to the pizza crust, to help it hold together. Without those, this recipe would have more of a crumbly, cracker-like texture.

What Makes this Recipe Healthier?

Almond flour is more nutrient-dense than white flour, so this pizza crust will leave you feeling more full and satisfied when compared to a traditional recipe.

Here are a few potential benefits of working with almond flour:

What I love also love about almond flour, is that it contains just one ingredient– almonds! You can even make your own homemade almond flour, if you don’t want to run out to the store for a bag.

Keep in mind, that you’ll get the best results in this case by using blanched almond flour, which is finely ground with the skins removed. Almond meal, on the other hand, has flecks of brown in the flour and can give you more cake-like, dense results.

How to Make Pizza Crust with Almond Flour

To make this recipe, you’ll simply stir all of the ingredients together in a bowl. The dough will be thick, resembling cookie dough.

almond flour pizza dough in bowl

Transfer the dough to a lined baking sheet, then use your hands to press it out into a flat circle, about 8-inches in diameter.

hand pressing the pizza crust flat on a lined pan

This isn’t a huge pizza crust, but you can double the recipe if you’d like to serve more than 2 people. (I would make 2 separate 8-inch pizza crusts in that case, so that the pizza doesn’t get too large to handle.)

The crust should be roughly 1/4-inch thick. Bake it for 10 minutes at 400ºF, until the crust looks dry on top. It will still feel slightly soft inside if you press lightly on it with your fingers.

baked almond flour pizza crust with sauce added on top

Add your favorite pizza toppings to the baked crust, then bake for 10 more minutes, or until the toppings are hot and the cheese is bubbly. You may want to turn on your oven’s broiler for the last 1 to 2 minutes, to help the cheese bubble.

vegan pizza toppings added to the pizza crust

I like to use Miyoko’s Vegan Mozzarella for a dairy-free cheese– it melts and tastes remarkably like the real thing. (I’ve also heard you can freeze the block and then shred it like real cheese!)

baked pizza with the melted cheese and sliced into 4 pieces

How to Freeze It

If you like the convenience of having a pizza crust stashed in your freezer, you can double this recipe and bake a second pizza crust to save for later. You don’t have to add the toppings before you freeze it, but you can if you want to.

Tightly wrap the pizza crust to prevent freezer burn, or slice it into 4 pieces and store them in an airtight container so you can heat up individual slices when you need a fast meal.

Making Substitutions

I’ve tested this recipe several times, trying the adjust the amount of oil and arrowroot needed. I’ve found that when you reduce the amount of arrowroot, the resulting crust is a little more crispy, with the edges of the crust reminding me of a cracker. If you like that texture, you can reduce the arrowroot by at least 2 tablespoons– using only 1/4 cup total.

The oil is added to this recipe so that you can flatten out the crust with your hands. If you use only water, the dough becomes very sticky, so it’s hard to work with, and the mouthfeel of the crust is “gummier” in texture.

I always try to keep oil to a minimum in my recipes, so trust me when I say this is the least I can get away with and still have my family enjoy this pizza crust.

Feel free to adjust the seasoning to your taste, too! I love the addition of garlic and oregano, to help counteract the mild almond flavor, but you can leave them out if you don’t have them on hand.

almond flour pizza sliced on white parchment paper

almond flour pizza sliced on white parchment paper
Print Pin
5 from 7 votes

Almond Flour Pizza Crust

This Almond Flour Pizza Crust is naturally gluten-free and Paleo friendly, and it happens to be vegan, too! This crust takes just 10 minutes to stir together, and is sturdy enough for you to pick up with your hands.
Course Main Course
Cuisine paleo, vegan
Keyword almond flour pizza crust
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 479kcal

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup blanched almond flour (53 grams)
  • 6 tablespoons arrowroot starch (50 grams; tapioca or corn starch should work, too)
  • 1/4 cup ground flax seed (27 grams; or ground chia seeds)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder (5 grams)
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder (2 grams)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt (1 gram)
  • 3 tablespoons water (41 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (25 grams)

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF and line a baking pan with parchment paper.
  • In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, arrowroot, flax, baking powder, garlic, oregano, and salt. Whisk well to break up any clumps, then stir in the olive oil and water. Stir well, until the dough sticks together. It will have a dense texture, similar to that of cookie dough.
  • Transfer the dough to the prepared baking sheet, and use your hands to press it out into a flat circle, about 1/4-inch thick, and roughly 8 to 10 inches in diameter. Bake at 400ºF for 10 minutes.
  • When the crust is done baking, add your favorite pizza toppings then return the pizza to the oven and bake for another 10 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbly. If your cheese isn't bubbly by then, I like to turn on the broiler and watch it 1 more minute with the oven door cracked, to make sure nothing burns. That is usually sufficient for getting all of the toppings nice and hot!
  • Slice the pizza into 4 pieces, and serve warm. Leftovers can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Video

Notes

I haven't tried freezing this pizza crust yet, but I imagine you could bake an extra crust and freeze it for later if you want to double this recipe and make 2 crusts at the same time.

Nutrition

Calories: 479kcal | Carbohydrates: 34g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 36g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Sodium: 301mg | Potassium: 365mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 206mg | Iron: 2mg
Nutrition information is for half the pizza. This information is automatically calculated and is just an estimate and not a guarantee. For best results, refer to the labels on your ingredients at home.

More Almond Flour Recipes

If you have more almond flour to use up, be sure to try one of these recipes below!

If you try this recipe, please leave a comment below letting me know how you like it! And if you make any modifications, I’d love to hear about those, too. We can all benefit from your experience!

Reader Feedback: What’s your favorite way to use almond flour?

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Comments

Christina

Could I sub in an egg for the arrowroot and flax seed? If so, would the cooking instructions still remain the same?

    Megan Gilmore

    I think the crust will be denser in that case, but I think the baking time would probably be the same.

Ellen

Thank you! This was easy and tasty! The only substitution I made was using
tapioca flour instead of arrowroot.

    Megan Gilmore

    I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Thanks for letting me know, and I’m glad to hear that tapioca flour was a success, too.

Jessica

Love your recipes, Megan! Could I substitute egg for the flax? If so, should I use one or two eggs? Thank you!

    Megan Gilmore

    I would probably try it with just one egg and see if the batter holds together that way. You might not need as much water in that case, either.

Kristin

Amazing pizza crust!!!Thank you for this! I have been experiementing with so many crust recipes and this is finally THE ONE. 😃

Michelle Lynn

Made this last night and it was amazing!! Perfectly held together and everyone loved it… it will be my go-to crust from now on! I forgot to use the baking powder and used the Tapioca Starch… also used ground chia in place of flax but it turned out great! And I still make a half-batch of your almond meal chocolate chip cookies almost EVERY evening!!! Thank you for another great recipe.

    Megan Gilmore

    I’m so happy to hear that, Michelle. Glad you are enjoying the recipes!

Myriam

Hello! Can I use oat flour instead of almond flour?

Elizabeth Santos

This makes the best gluten and dairy free pizza crust. Comes together quickly and the taste is amazing. Will definitely be making this again.

Tb

I am impressed at how quickly this comes together and it tastes delicious! Thanks for the great recipe 😊

Chasity Hedges

I found that I had to add extra water..did I do something wrong? Also…I only just realized that a serving was for half of a pizza…bc I ate the whole thing and I see why now..I”m still full and a little bloated this morning after eating it last night…hoping it will keep me full all the way until lunch!

also I used xhanthan gum in place of arrowroot and think it still worked fine.I substituted it out 1:1 so I’m hoping that was the right call.

Diane

A nice alternative to the more labor intensive (but worth it anyway) cauliflower pizza crust.
Turns out very nice & crispy!

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